5.29.2008

effective art

A friend's blog had an awful post a few weeks ago. One of her coworkers had been struck and killed while riding his bike. Not wearing a helmet - which doesn't always save your life, sure, but still.

I saw his ghost bike yesterday.

This is not it. This is another ghost bike for someone else who died.
I guess I feel what it means to be a writer the most strongly when I become horribly aware of how words fail me sometimes. Or rather, how I fail the words. I fail to pick the right ones and line them up just right. To explain what it was like to see that white skeleton of a bike under that filthy overpass, cold and chained up and abandoned, with his name and way, way, WAY too short of a lifespan printed on it. And to think, oh my gosh.

That's HIM.



I continued running my errands and saw a woman blithely biking around without a helmet. This nice middle-aged woman with her cruiser bike going to Jo-Ann Fabric. I had to look away. I just wanted to scream at her.
It breaks my heart how abandoned they are. Forever waiting for someone to come back, unlock them, and ride them safely home.

3 comments:

DinaBear said...

Tragically, I only just learned about ghost bikes (thank you NPR). I have yet to see one in person. They truly fill my heart with sadness, but above all, they remind me to be safe.

Last night I saw a guy riding the wrong way down Lincoln without a helmet and wearing all black and without any lights. I wanted to scream too.

Mikey said...

I remember seeing one of these when I was [biking] in NYC last fall. Then I saw another and another and another. It's sobering for cyclists and motorists alike to see these urban descansos.

PatricktShepherd said...

I've been on too many ghost bike installation rides

"It breaks my heart how abandoned they are. Forever waiting for someone to come back, unlock them, and ride them safely home."

Well fucking said...